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PSF-Aware Filtered Backprojection for Focal Plane Scanning Optical Projection Tomography

Introduction

 

fps-opt-thorem

Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a 3D microscopy technique for imaging small transparent animals (up to a few millimeters) using visible light. Similar to x-ray computed tomography (CT), OPT involves the acquisition of multiple 2D projections through a 3D sample, with each projection taken from a different angle of rotation. However, unlike CT, which uses x-rays that travel in approximately straight lines, OPT uses visible light and microscope optics that accept light rays from a range of angles over a cone. In order to apply traditional tomographic reconstruction techniques to OPT, researchers use low numerical aperture (NA) objectives with OPT to reduce the acceptance angle of the system and achieve approximately straight-line projections. However, low NA objectives have worse lateral resolution than high NA objectives, thus limiting the lateral resolution of OPT systems. To achieve high spatial resolution with OPT, we utilize focal-plane-scanning OPT (FPS-OPT), for which we derive an analytic inversion formula that fully incorporates the system’s 3D optical point-spread-function, allowing us to reconstruct a high resolution 3D volume with reduced optical blur.

For more information, please refer to our paper.

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References

[1] K. G. Chan and M. Liebling, "Direct inversion algorithm for focal plane scanning optical projection tomography," in Biomedical Optics Express, vol. 8, no. 11, pp. 5349-5358, 2017.

[2] K. G. Chan and M. Liebling, "A point-spread-function-aware filtered backprojection algorithm for focal-plane-scanning optical projection tomography," IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), 2016.

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